Pin Trader Club

Pin terms and what they mean

This article will hopefully help to decipher some of those terms you may read when people are talking about their pins. 

Posts


The post in the part of the pin which will pierce through fabric. Also referred to as a prong or nub, this is the “stabby” part of a pin that you would pierce through clothing. The Disney pin trading community most commonly refer to it as a post. Small pins will generally just have one post but larger pins can have 3 or more posts. "Nubs" are the two little bits beside the post which help to keep the pin in place.
The back of the pin showing the post
The back of the pin showing the post

Cloisonné


This refers to a type of pin and the way it is created. When pins are made the metal is first stamped out and recesses or holes are left, that are then filled with enamel powder and baked. The pin will then be smoothed down. This is what most Disney pins are.
A typical Disney pin (isn't Pluto cute here?!)
A typical Disney pin (isn't Pluto cute here?!)

Pin on pin


This refers to a type of pin. The pin will have a base layer and then other layers of metal will be layered on, this creates a 3D effect and helps certain elements pop.

Moving parts


Moving part pins will have as the name implies moving parts. These can take several forms. Some pins will have a hinge and open like a book or door. Some will have sliders that pull out and reveal a hidden element or some will add character to a character i.e. a moving arm or leg.

Lenticular


This type of pin will have several images that will be revealed when it is moved in a certain way, it can also be used to create the illusion of movement or 3D.

Dangle/dangler


This is a pin that has an element attached by a chain.
The pumpkin is suspended with a chain
The pumpkin is suspended with a chain

Bobble


This is a pin which has a spring element to help create movement. This is often used on the top of pins to move hat elements.

Spinner


This is a pin which has a spinning element. The base of the pin will be static and it will have the spinner element mounted on top of the base. These are often used to only show elements when it has been spun.
The characters face spin around on the pin base
The characters face spin around on the pin base

Backstamp


This refers to the information that is printed or stamped on the back of the pin. Disney pins should always have at the very least “© Disney” stamped on it. Newer pin trading pins will have the Disney pin trading stamp as well (of which there are several variants). Some older pins or special event pins won’t have it. Often Pixar, Nightmare Before Christmas and others will have extra stamps denoting the franchise but this isn’t always the case. Limited edition pins should have their edition amount stamped on the back.
This is a Nightmare Before Christmas pin which shows the franchise stamp as well as the older Disney pin trading stamp
This is a Nightmare Before Christmas pin which shows the franchise stamp as well as the older Disney pin trading stamp


This article was written by elaine on Thursday 28 November 2019.


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